GENETIC COUNSELING

CDC BLOG

Who needs genetic counseling:

  • Those with a personal history or family history suggestive of a hereditary cancer syndrome.
  • Had a previous genetic test 3-5+ years ago, but you may want to consider additional testing.
  • Multiple family members with the same type of or related cancers.
  • Rare cancers
  • Ashkenazi Jewish history.

Benefits of genetic counseling:

  • Genetic screening can help calculate the likelihood of a fetus being born with a certain disorder.
  • Provides peace of mind or information for better understanding and decision-making.
  • Appropriate testing will be given.
  • Decision making will be made based on scientific information.

Heredity risk for uterine cancer is about 5 percent. Surgery is the primary treatment for endometrial (uterine) cancer. 

Genetic testing may be appropriate for ovarian cancer:

  • You’ve had or been diagnosed with ovarian cancer.
  • You’ve had at least two types of other cancers.
  • You’re related to someone with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.
  • You have Lynch syndrome. Women with this inherited condition have a 9% to 12% chance of getting ovarian cancer in their lifetime.
  • You have at least one relative who’s had cancer and meets the criteria for this type of genetic testing.
  • You had a negative genetic test more than 3 years ago. Testing technology is always improving.

Two main genetic factors increase the risk of cervical cancer:

Other gynecologic cancers:

Genetic test results aren’t always clear-cut. If your test result is negative, you might not be scanned for the mutation. But you could still have another type of genetic change that hasn’t been linked to ovarian cancer yet. A “variant of uncertain significance” result means the lab found a mutation that may or may not be linked to ovarian cancer.

A negative test doesn’t have to be the end of your genetic testing. As with an uncertain result, check with your doctor or genetic counselor to see if there are other options.

Find a Genetics Specialist

There are various ways to access genetic counseling services, including in person, by phone, and by video conference.

Find a genetic counselorexternal icon using the National Society of Genetic Counselors directory.

I welcome your feedback, questions, and comments. Thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to read this blog.